A Childhood Cancer Survivor Blogging about the World of Childhood Cancer

Posts tagged ‘Childhood Cancer Awareness Month’

Dear Cincinnati Bengals – Coming Together For a Greater Purpose

Austin Munoz Moorpark Football Senior Night

Austin Munoz –Moorpark Football Senior Night

Dear Cincinnati Bengals,

Thank you.

As a parent of a childhood cancer survivor, I praise your recent decisions surrounding Devon Still and his daughter, Leah, who is fighting stage 4 neuroblastoma. No one knows the darkness of those words, “Your child has cancer,” than parents who have heard them. No one knows the hopelessness, the despair, the panic, or the chaos of that moment than parents who have lived it.

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“Dealing with cancer is like a whole different world.”

~Devon Still

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What you have chosen to do is a mark of excellence. Your decision to retain Devon— even when his mind and heart were quite understandably elsewhere— is top-notch. Your organization’s decisions demonstrate the strength of character, compassion, and integrity of those in your front office. If I could, I would hug each and every one of you. As I did, you would see the tears in my eyes that are now rolling down my cheeks. It’s hard for me to believe that not everyone makes choices like you have. It touches me deep into my soul to see you have chosen humanity over financial gain. I believe you will see this is a wise choice as well in the not-so-long-future. Devon will become an even better player than he has ever been. Once you have witnessed your child fight for their life, you become a warrior too… one who will move the heavens and Earth to accomplish your goals.

Cincinnati Bengals, you are one class act.

And you haven’t stopped there. Not only have you retained Devon, but you have gone an entire football field farther by stepping up to raise money for pediatric cancer research! This is a gift that will save children’s lives!

Leah will be in my prayers. Devon, his wife, and his family will all be in my prayers. The entire Bengal organization will be in my prayers of gratitude.

Thank you for kicking childhood cancer out of Paul Brown Stadium!

May many other organizations follow the lead you have taken. You have set a fine example of coming together for a greater purpose!

With sincere thanks and squishy hugs,

Lee Marchiano

Momcologist & Childhood Cancer Advocate

“It’s not all about competition. It’s not all about what you can do on the field, but we come together for a greater purpose.”

~Devon Still

youtu.be/xl0sjEWKYI8 

Photo shared from Twitter @dev_Still71

Leah Still

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http://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/nfl/bengals/2014/09/14/cincinnati-bengals-devon-still-leah-still/15647737/

Help the Bengals SACK PEDIATRIC CANCER

https://www.pldgit.com/campaign/768450939739702307

Devon Still jersey– $15 goes to pediatric cancer research. (Over $400,000 raised in just four days!)

http://www.cincyshirts.com/cincyshirts//still-strong-devon-still-shirt.html

 

 

What Childhood Cancer has in Common with Landing on the Moon

IMG_2650We are nine days into September, Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. While I feel thrilled and encouraged by more Gold Lighting victories for childhood cancer awareness, there are times when I realize just how far we have to go before we even come close to becoming societies educated about the number one disease killing our children. One of these times struck me right between the eyes.

I learned, just a day ago, that Neil Armstrong’s daughter, Karen, died of a brain tumor in 1962. Wow.

Given the excitement of this kind of job, why did Armstrong choose to join the space program? Hansen says he isn’t sure, even after all his research, but he pointed to the fact that Neil’s daughter, Karen, died of cancer at the age of two in early 1962. “I think it had a very fundamental effect on Neil’s marriage, on his family, on Neil’s own career,” Hansen said.

“It was only four or five months after his daughter’s death that Armstrong put his name in for astronaut selection. Hansen believes that Armstrong “saw Apollo as a way of refocusing his energies and doing something important, and it was a way for him to really deal with his daughter’s death.”

                                                                ~James R. Hansen, Biographer

Further, I learned that a child who is diagnosed with DIPG—the same type of cancer Karen died from—is treated today with the exact same treatment.

A child diagnosed with DIPG today is treated with the exact same treatment as a child who was diagnosed in 1962!

With the tremendous advances in every area of human life since 1962, it is appalling that this is true.

When Melinda and I were in Washington, D.C. this past June for Childhood Cancer Action Days, we planned extra time to visit museums. Something about seeing the exhibits where people gathered together to stand up for their human rights made me look at the current state of childhood cancer advocacy in a more focused light.

Solving the problems surrounding childhood cancer is not going to happen without a joining together of forces, without establishing specific goals, or without sacrifices. Just like Neil Armstrong refocused, today there are numerous bereaved parents who are “refocusing” their “energies and doing something important.” These parents are heroes. I would love to begin naming a list of them, but I know that is not what they want. They don’t want their names honored; they want their children honored. They want awareness that leads to funding for research that will bring less toxic treatments and cures for childhood cancer.

I won’t name them. History will name them. History will remember them. Your children and your grandchildren, and their grandchildren will have a better life here on Earth because of the sacrifices these heroes are choosing to make today. Someday in the future, I will stand in that same museum and read about these people and the great advances they achieved toward cures for childhood cancer.

The most recent communication I received from PAC2 states exactly where we need to begin to be certain that a child will not be diagnosed with cancer 52 years from now and receive the same treatment as today! After typing “52 years”, I cannot breathe…

Go to the moon challengeFrom: PAC2 https://www.facebook.com/PeopleAgainstChildhoodCancer/photos/a.372700847313.154528.370104237313/10152297179327314/?type=1&theater

#ChildhoodCancerChallenge

#GoToTheMoonChallenge

What childhood cancer has in common with landing on the moon is history. The history of Neil Armstrong’s loss of his precious daughter, Karen, must awaken us. We have been “asleep,” for 52 years while our children have been crying out to us for help. Like Neil Armstrong, we have the opportunity to make history. In order to make history, we must create and carry out specific goals, just like they did in the 1960’s in their quest to land on the moon.

“Actually, with cancer, the end of each day is a goal, and waking up in the morning is a victory.”

 ~Melinda Marchiano, Grace: A Child’s Intimate Journey Through Cancer and Recovery

It’s time to combine all forces on deck. There is not a moment to waste.

History is being made each moment. Take the #ChildhoodCancerChallenge

Commit. Sacrifice. Focus. Act. Adequate funding for childhood cancer research must begin today for quicker cures.

This will be better than any moon landing could ever be! The end of childhood cancer…

Six Year-Old Joseph Maroney one the Today Show 4 -9 -2014

Six Year-Old Joseph Maroney one the Today Show 4 -9 -2014

Guest Blogger: Lee Marchiano

Childhood Cancer, The Empire State Building, and King Kong

Empire State Building ResponseDear Empire State Building,

It’s true we have had our differences recently. It’s true that “an individual” did request a “tower lighting for childhood cancer awareness.” (Thank you, Tony Stoddard! A Day of Yellow and Gold to Fight Childhood Cancer https://www.facebook.com/yellowandgoldforcole?ref=br_tf.)

What is missing from your statement is the fact that The Empire State Building not only turned down Tony Stoddard’s request, but refused requests from multiple childhood cancer foundations who all applied “responsibly.” What other conclusion is the childhood cancer community to make—other than the obvious? How can we help but conclude that you simply do not care about children with cancer?

You lit The Empire State Building for the release of an Alicia Keys album.

“Wait Til You See My Smile”
When the wind is blowing in your face
Sometimes in life you don’t see straight
Pray to Him, He will show
When your head is in a certain place
Nobody around to make you safe
Stand strong and you will grow
Could it be? Could it be that “the wind is blowing in your face” and you can’t “see straight”?

Or… could it be that you are simply uneducated about childhood cancer? Could it be that your lack of  awareness is the real reason for your refusal? How ironic it is that your lack of awareness is exactly what could be causing the blockade to more awareness! Please, click on this link to learn vital facts about childhood cancer from The Truth 365.

http://www.thetruth365.org/cancer-facts/

Class dismissed.

Would you now please reconsider your decision?

Without a doubt, what would make you change your decision in less than a heartbeat would be for you to actually meet a child fighting cancer. Their utter innocence, their unabashed courage, and their inner strength would melt you. Did you know that current treatments for childhood cancer are equivalent to torture? Did you know that while these children battle for their lives, they are always thinking of others around them and how they are feeling? Have you ever seen the face of a child who looks to you for hope?

Here’s the thing.

You have the ability to bring joy and happiness to these suffering children. You have the ability to shine a light of hope over New York City and our country. You have the opportunity to save children’s lives through awareness that leads to research funding. Imagine—you could be like Santy Claus when these kids see that the Empire State Building has given them a brilliant, shiny, gold gift of hope. You could be a shimmering mirror that reflects the beautiful light that shines inside of these kids.

“Wait til You See My Smile”

As other New York establishments announce that they will be lighting gold for pediatric cancer awareness month in September, like the Helmsley Building, Times Square, Coney Island Parachute Jump, and 1 World Trade Center, I ask you to do the same. A change in your decision will not mean you are weak and crumbling under pressure; it will mean you are strong and growing.

“Stand strong and you will grow.”

If you consider all of this and your decision to light gold for childhood cancer awareness month is still, “No,” then will you please book King Kong to climb up the side of the Empire State Building to spread gold glitter all over New York City in September? #EmpireGoGold

With hope for a world without childhood cancer,

Lee Marchiano

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